Cheaper Student Auto Insurance

The reality is young people pay the most of any demographic for automobile coverage. The good news is cheaper student auto insurance can be attained by making some smart moves. Below are some simple steps students can take to lower their premiums.

1. Stay on your Parents Policy

Unless you are making serious money and can afford super high premiums, talk to your parents about adding your car onto their policy. This will save you about 20% or more. Bundling multiple automobiles is a simple way to save and this includes students living on a tight budget.

2. Get Several Discounts

As a young driver, you might be thinking there are no discounts available for you. This is simply not true. If you have a solid GPA of a B or higher, you automatically qualify for a price break. Getting top grades will not only help you get a good job later on, but will lower your premiums about 5% or more. So why do insurers give lower rates to students with good grades? The secret is in the data. Auto insurance companies have compiled a huge amount of statistical data about accidents. There is a direct link between people who are disciplined and responsible academically and lower vehicle crashes. Car insurance premiums are based on the perceived risk associated with a driver, based on a person’s profile. After you finish school, you can continue to get these discounted pricing for up to a year, which is another incentive to get good grades.

To get this discount, students need to meet several qualifications. These include:

* Most auto insurers offer these special prices to students that have and maintain a G-P-A of a B or higher during the school year. The old adage of hard work pays is absolutely true.

* You need to be an active full-time student at a high school or college.

* Most car insurance companies put a cap on this discount at 25.

If you are reading this as a parent, talk to your kid about using this as a motivation for getting great grades. Reward them with something special, like a night out at a special restaurant, if they come home with a good report card.

3. Take a Certified Safe Driver Class

A great way for students to both learn about safe driving and lower their rates is by taking a driver safety class. Usually, the classes are held by retired highway patrol police officers who will share their amazing tips on how to stay safe on the road. You will learn how to drive carefully in rainy weather, snow and what to do to avoid accidents to name a few lessons. After you complete a certified class, call your provider and ask for this discount. Many companies will give an automatic 10% price reduction.

4. Buy a Vehicle that is Cheaper to Insure

The vehicle that you buy is one of the biggest things that will determine your car insurance costs. If you are a young student on a fixed income or have no job, it only makes sense to get a car that is cheap to insure. Yes, this means a boring car like a Toyota Corolla or used Subaru. Vehicles that are 5 or more years old can be bought at 50% off retail. If you buy the car outright and don’t finance it, you will have more control over the coverage you buy. If you don’t drive too much and are careful on the road, it might be smart to get a cheap liability only policy. This can be had for about $100, even for young students under 25 years of age.

5. Consider a Resident Student Discount

Most people have never heard of a resident student insurance discount. In a nutshell, those students who leave for college in a different state or city can get a big discount on rates. The big thing to consider however is students cannot drive while school is in session. They will be restricted to special events, such as the Christmas holiday or summer vacation. Students who want to take advantage of this program need to first contact their insurer to make sure it’s available and then provide the proper documentation, which is a certified copy of admission to the school or university they are enrolled in.

Auto Insurance Rates: Do They Rise As We Age?

The auto insurance industry realizes that the senior population has a lot of driving experience under its belt. That does go a long way as far as safety is concerned, and, seniors are rewarded in good measure with low premiums on their policies. But, by the same token, no one can deny the fact that as the years go by, eyesight becomes weaker and people are not as quick to react as before. In addition, compromised health situations tend to develop, necessitating medication.

Studies indicate that all this can translate into car accidents – a significantly large amount of these involve tragic fatalities. The insurance companies know about the resulting damages, injuries and death because of related claims that are submitted by policyholders. And claims are an expensive drawback that triggers rates to go up.

Before you begin to panic, allow us to reassure you that the premium hike for seniors at a certain stage is rather slight and it can be countered by savings rewarded to those who attend approved safety driving classes, as well as discounts that many insurance carriers offer.

For clarity, please view the following synopsis of the varying insurance developments in the course of the senior’s driving life.

• If you are in the fifties, you will essentially enjoy lower premiums than those older and younger than you. This is because you typically are still in good health and you still have quick reflex reactions.

• From sixty years of age to sixty-five, you still will be getting the less expensive auto insurance premiums – something that may shift afterwards.

• If you are in the 65-69 year old category, you might see your auto policy increase in rate. In this case, it is in your interest to seek an insurance agency that has the ability to shop the network to see if you can get a cheaper policy.

• Between the ages of seventy and seventy-nine you will generally see an increase in premiums. This is related to a higher risk of an accident. It does not mean, however, that you will not find a cheaper plan elsewhere with a company that understands you still may be in good physical shape and are not personally prone to a collision.

• Once you hit eighty, you will be viewed as a high-risk to the auto insurance industry and retroactively be billed higher rates. If you choose to continue driving at this age, speak to an experienced independent agency that has the ability to shop for cheaper premiums and get applicable discounts to lower your premium.

Whatever your situation, remember to take all precautions in driving safely. After all, it’s your well-being and others on the road that is at stake.

What If Health Insurance Were Like Car Insurance?

Consider your body an automobile with legs, a pedestrian transportation unit. Your legs are your wheels, food is your gasoline, your skeleton is your chassis, your eyes are your headlights. Basically, your body is a high-tech machine.

Every machine requires maintenance. People expect to pay something to keep automobiles and other high-tech machines in running order. Drivers pay for gasoline, for tires, for oil changes. It’s just a fact of life. Why muck things up by getting insurance involved? Surely it’s quicker – and cheaper – to leave insurance out of the equation.

So it should be with health insurance. You pay for the small stuff, the trips to doctor, routine medication, eyeglasses, etc. – perhaps a thousand bucks a year. For big ticket items your insurance kicks in.

Insurance would be for things beyond your control, say accidents or serious infections. Or perhaps you’d like to purchase a “parts and labor” warranty, in case something goes wrong with the engine (heart) or you need a new transmission (hip replacement).

This model is similar to a high-deductible insurance plan, the kind many self-employed individuals purchase. Under a specified amount, the patient pays all medical expenses. Above the pre-set limit, insurance pays. There are high-deductible plans beginning at the $1,000 deductible level, with higher levels also available at even lower premiums. A $5,000 deductible is a cost-effective choice for many self-employed workers.

These plans are much less expensive than traditional insurance. The difference in premiums can be tucked away in a health-savings account to cover low-ticket items. Hopefully, with time, your savings increases, allowing you to choose a higher-deductible (and therefore less expensive) plan.

Doesn’t this make sense? For the first $1,000 to $5,000 (whichever plan you choose) you’re spending your own money, which gives you a strong incentive to economize. Better to ration your own care than depend on someone else to do so. If you come down with pneumonia or need your gallbladder out, your insurance kicks in.

Naturally, you want to remain healthy and stay out of the hospital. That’s strong incentive to take care of yourself. Plus, you maintain the highest degree of freedom yet still have a safety net in case of emergency.

The incentive to limit one’s own expenses is what’s missing from government-sponsored health plans such as Medicaid. Somehow we need to find a way for everyone to have a stake in the expense. Is it fair to ask those who are actually working to economize when those who are not working receive unlimited care at no cost?

Everyone needs to pay something or the system will become unsustainable – it nearly is already. “Free” health care ultimately increases expenses for everyone.

Making health insurance like car insurance won’t fix everything, but it is a step in the right direction.

The Hidden Dangers of "Permissive Use" Restrictions in Your Auto Insurance Policy

One of the most frequent questions I get as an auto insurance agent is “who is insured to drive my car?”

Sometimes the answer to this question can be trickier than most people realize. If you never loan your car to others and you never will, none of the restrictions I discuss here will matter to you and you can stop reading now.

Short answer:

People that are listed on your policy enjoy the full benefits of your policy coverages with no restrictions. For those that borrow your car that aren’t listed, they are generally covered as long as you have given them permission to use your car; this is called “Permissive Use” and all policies have some form of, or interpretation of, permissive use. Excluded drivers are never covered nor are un-named drivers who “use the vehicle without a reasonable belief that the person is entitled to do so” (sometimes referred to as “theft”).

Depending on the company you are insured with, interpretations of permissive use can vary dramatically and some insurance carriers are very strict in their enforcement of the rules.

By reducing or restricting coverages through different applications of permissive use, carriers can reduce their risk (and claims costs) thereby reducing the cost of their policies to make them more affordable for their policy holders.

Three examples of the “Permissive use” restrictions carriers utilize include: “Drop-down limits”; “Double deductibles”; and “No physical damage coverage”.

Drop-down Limits:

Oftentimes there are dramatic reductions in coverage amounts on insurance policies even when a permissive user has an accident. One such reduction is called “drop-down limits”. “Drop-down limits” means that if a person has an accident while borrowing your car, the limits of liability are reduced to what the state’s minimums are. For example, the state of California requires minimum limits of only $15,000 per person for bodily injuries (BI)/$30,000 per occurrence maximum for bodily injuries (BI)/$5,000 for property damage (PD).

Example: Driver “A” has an insurance policy with full coverage with permissive use and his liability coverages are $100,000 per person (for BI)/$300,000 per occurrence (for BI maximum)/$50,000 per occurrence (for PD). His policy has a “drop-down limit” clause. Let’s say he loans his car to a friend (driver “B”) and that friend has a serious accident where the bodily injuries to other party amount to $65,000 and he totals the other car which has a value of $28,000. In this scenario, the “drop down limit” is in effect and the most Driver A’s policy will pay is $15,000 for the other persons injuries and $5,000 for their vehicle which clearly isn’t enough. In this case, Driver A is legally liable for the balance of the damages because he is the owner of the vehicle; $50,000 for injuries and $23,000 for the vehicle. If Driver B has coverage, their coverage would be secondary and their limits would then apply until they run out as well. Otherwise, Driver “A” will most likely be sued by the other party.

Double Deductibles:

One coverage that is available with your auto insurance is called collision insurance. Collision insurance protects your vehicle for damages that are a result of a collision with another object. I.e. another vehicle, a building, etc. Collision coverage has a deductible which is the “out of pocket” amount you have to pay first before the insurance carrier steps in to repair or replace your car. Typically deductibles can range from $100 to $2500 but most of the time they are either $500 or $1,000.

They way the “double deductible” restriction works is if an un-named driver has an accident while driving the car with your permission, the collision deductible is doubled. Hence your $500 deductible is now $1,000, or your $1,000 is now $2,000. Hopefully your friend that borrowed your car is willing to chip-in and pay the extra deductible amount.

Sometimes the “double deductible” restriction is based on the age of the driver who borrows your car. For example, the deductible for collision is only doubled if the driver is younger than 25 years old.

No Physical Damage Coverage:

This restriction works just like the “double deductible” described above. However, this restriction is much more punitive.

Simply stated, if an un-named driver borrows your car and has an accident the insurance company will pay the third-party damages (liability), but the damages to your vehicle will not be eligible for coverage.

All of these “permissive use” restrictions are described in detail in your policy initially and also in your renewals. These restrictions should also be disclosed by your agent when you buy your policy, which is why you want a professional insurance agent/broker who really understands these intricacies and can effectively explain these restrictions to you when you apply for coverage.

Permissive use restrictions are also very common and are employed by some large, reputable nationwide insurance companies so be sure to examine your policy carefully.

Auto insurance policies are not all standardized. They are different from carrier to carrier and there are a multitude of coverage benefits, restrictions and exclusions that are unique to each company. Make sure to consult with your agent to see how your particular policy works.

Food for thought – next time you are considering buying a policy “online” without a human helping you, or from an “800#” with an “order taker”, consider how details like these may not be adequately described or may somehow get lost in translation – it pays to have an agent who can really look out for you.

FR44 Insurance for DUI and DWI Drivers Is Sensible

The two distinguishing features of FR44 car insurance are its higher liability limits and its exclusivity for DWI / DUI drivers. Currently only Florida and Virginia are utilizing this format in their latest efforts to curb drinking and driving. It is a program that enjoys widespread support there, and will likely be adopted by other states. When it comes to insurance, other states do not make a distinction between high risk driver groups as they mandate SR22 car insurance for all of them.

Texas leads the nation in drunken driving crashes and fatalities. Texas law enforcement has an equally impressive record of DWI arrests and citations issued. However, It is fairly commonplace everywhere to be pulled over as many states and municipalities vigorously seek out those who drink and drive. Issuing citations and prosecuting these drivers has become big business for municipalities, lawyers, insurance companies, and others. Nevertheless, enforcement is widely supported as roadways inevitably become safer from this activity. Many states may soon consider mandating increased liability limits for their DWI / DUI drivers just as Florida and Virginia have done via FR44 insurance.

A DUI convicted driver in Florida must obtain a car insurance policy with liability limits of 100/300/50 and submit proof via the FR44 certificate filing. Formerly the DUI driver in Florida only had to carry limits of 10/20/10 as evidenced by their SR22 insurance filing. In Virginia the FR44 liability limits of 50/100/40 for their DUI drivers are double required by the SR22 policy.

For several key reasons the FR44 car insurance policy has been an excellent development in Florida and Virginia. First of all, the increased liability limits is an excellent community wide benefit as more insurance coverage means more protection for an injured party. Secondly, the initial higher insurance premiums experienced by convicted drivers for the increased limits becomes a deterrent for repeating the offense. And, the increase in premiums along with other consequences endured by drunk drivers usually have an overall modifying effect on their driving habits. These drivers tend to be more careful and actually have fewer accidents and claims as evidenced by their low loss ratios.

When our family owned insurance agency began to write an increased number of DUI policies we were concerned that our insurance carriers would find this objectionable. We were very pleased to find out that several of the companies were having good performance numbers with this risk class and were encouraging more policies. As time goes on these companies are competing more and more for DWI / DUI policies with lower rates. There are still plenty of companies that penalize these drivers with high rates and cancellations, so, shopping around after a citation is important and may be necessary. Car insurance is generally the last step before convicted drivers can reinstate their license and it is often the most dreaded. Thankfully for them, car insurance usually does not turn out to be the worst of their consequences.

DUI policyholders in Florida and Virginia, upon subsequent renewals, begin to enjoy increasing discounts associated with having high liability limits. And good performance in this risk group from safer driving habits translate to improved insurance rates. In the long run these drivers actually are able to reduce their premiums while enjoying higher limits of coverage. And this is especially so as the DUI conviction begins to age, and its associated surcharge diminishes, and is eventually eliminated altogether. Many drivers, without a DUI conviction, do not have the foresight or discipline to maintain high liability limits which leads to discounts that reduce overall premiums.

It is easy to see that the FR44 insurance policy is a winning scenario for all involved. The community at large enjoys a higher level of insurance protection for their citizens, the DWI or DUI policyholders eventually pay less for more coverage, and the insurance companies, lawyers, ticket clinics, etc… make a profit. And, Overtime, the safer driving habits of the DWI / DUI driver also translate to improved insurance rates. It seems to me that all states will benefit from the sensible FR44 insurance programs that I have experienced as an independent agent in Florida and Virginia.

How Can You Lower Your Auto Insurance Deductible?

Many people raise their car insurance deductibles in order to have more affordable car insurance premiums. By doubling your insurance deductibles, you can shave as much as 40% off the price of your premiums.

However, this is only a good idea if you have money put aside to pay the deductible if you have an at-fault accident. If you cannot access this money easily, you may not be able to pay your portion of repair bills, and your car may not be fixed in a timely manner. Worse, you could be under obligation to pay for a portion of damages to someone else's property, and be unable to do so. Many people without large reserves of cash must keep their deductibles low. In order to do this, however, they often have to pay higher premiums.

Is there a way to lower your deductible and still keep your premiums manageable?

There are several ways you can accomplish this goal. Each method takes some planning and discipline, but each can be achieved by anyone looking for a low deductible and a low premium.

First, you can choose to insure with a company which offers a "vanishing deductible" program. According to these programs, your deductible decreases by a set amount each year that you are accident-free and claim-free. Some of these programs allow you to lower all of your deductibles, and some only allow you to lower your collision or liability deductible. Different companies offer different amounts for the deduction and at different rates. You can compare programs to find one that works well for you.

Another option is to create a plan in which you gradually save the amount of your deductible while slowly raising your deductible each six months. Here is how this would work: suppose that your current deductible is $ 250, the lowest your company allows. Now suppose that you would save $ 100 per renewal period by raising your deductible to $ 500. If you do so and save the money you saved on your premiums, plus your initial $ 250, you would have $ 450 in one year, almost enough to pay your new deductible. You can continue to save money so that you can gradually raise your deductible to $ 750, then $ 1000. You may even choose to raise your deductible higher than this if your company permits you to do so. As you slowly raise your deductible, your premiums will decrease, allowing you to save up the money you will need to pay the new, higher deductible.

You can also find a company which offers "accident forgiveness." With accident forgiveness, you can be "forgiven" for your first accident with no deductible if the accident does not exceed a certain dollar amount in total cost. This is very useful to save your deductible fund if you have a minor fender-bender. You can also save money and pay for damages yourself if the accident is very minor; in this way, by not making a claim, you keep your premiums lower and do not have unexpected increases in the price of your automobile insurance.

Other ways you can lower your deductible are to apply for a deductible reduction with your insurance company, which can be balanced by other discounts for which you may be eligible. If you are not currently taking advantage of all possible discounts, you may be cheating yourself out of savings which could pay for a lower deductible.

Be sure to consider all the separate deductibles which apply to your policy as a whole. If you have full coverage, which includes liability, comprehensive, and collision, you probably have separate deductibles for each policy. In addition, you probably have a deductible for such things as uninsured motorist coverage. Some states set the deductible for uninsured motorist coverage by law; you cannot raise that deductible even if you want to. However, most states allow you to pay with the deductibles on your collision and comprehensive policies, raising or lowering them as you see fit.

The Insurance Take on an Accident by the Person You Lent Your Car to

I had to empathize with my friend. Poor guy: out of the goodness of his heart, the man lent his vehicle to a relative. And then, his relative got into a major accident, resulting in two totaled vehicles – the car he had borrowed from my friend and the truck he collided into!

For those uneducated in the matter, when you lend your car to someone else, that driver is referred to as a permissive driver by the insurance industry. If a permissive driver causes an accident, here’s how the insurance companies will respond.

Auto Insurance and an Accident Caused by a Permissive Driver

If you gave permission to someone not listed as a driver on your auto insurance policy and that person causes a car accident, the procedure is generally as follows.

1. In the event the driver and the car owner have individual auto policies, the car owner’s insurance will pay for damages under the collision part of the coverage – after any required deductible is paid out-of-pocket by the policyholder.

2. If there are significant property damages as well as bodily injury to the other driver or his or her passengers or pedestrians, the car owner’s insurance will cover the damages as well as any legal fees of an associated lawsuit filed against the car owner. Insurance payouts are subject to the limits on the policy. If the limits on the car owner’s policy lead to an outstanding balance, the driver of the borrowed car can seek compensation from his or her own insurance company to receive the remaining owed funds for the damages. If the borrower of the car to is injured in an accident he or she caused, related payments would generally be covered under the Personal Injury Protection portion of his or her auto policy. In the event, the driver does not have this insurance protection but the car’s owner does – coverage will go through that.

3. What if the person who borrowed the car got into an accident but did not have a valid driver’s license? In this case, there’s a good chance that coverage may be denied. Many insurance company exclude coverage for an unlicensed driver. If this occurs, the car’ owner you and the ‘permissive driver’ will be responsible to pay for all damages as well as court fees if there are any.

But aside from related aggravation and possible wallet burnout,policyholders may find their premiums up at time of the policy’s renewal.

Of course, anyone dealing with an experienced independent agency that’s appointed to do direct business with many of the leading underwriters have an advantage of working with the edge in the market to locate the lowest premium available under the circumstances.

Traffic Violations, Auto Insurance, and Your Rates

Auto Insurance is expensive enough. You do not need a traffic ticket to make your premiums go up even higher. That is why it is important to drive carefully, courteously and within the legal speed limits. This way, you will give no reason for a police officer to pull you over and hand you a summons in regard to irresponsible driving patterns.

You may wonder. The ticket itself involves a fine. Why would you be penalized any further by your insurance company?

To be honest, your insurance company is not interested in punishing you. They are solely out for their own interests. When they see you have been convicted for a moving violation, they view that as a peril to their operations. Traffic violations demonstrate to the insurance company that you are at more risk of being a part of a car accident or collision than someone that has a clean driving record. A car accident, in insurance terms, means there will likely be a claim that they will cost them money. The insurance company balances the risk of an auto accident claim with a raised premium or added charge.

Of course each company gauges its response to a poor driving record individually. By and large though, they have a team that looks at the general behavior you have exhibited when you are behind the driving wheel.

And when deciding the amount of the rate increase, the insurance company will consider the severity of the traffic violation.

So, if you are committed of drunk driving, you will find yourself up against an extremely strict reaction in regard to a rate increase. If you have merely been ticketed for a broken headlight, judgement meted out against you will be mild. And if you have been found to be speeding 15 miles above the city limits, you will get a higher increase than if you would have been speeding only five miles beyond the posted mileage.

People often ask about parking tickets. For the most part, the motorist who receives a parking ticket need only worry about paying that ticket. The insurance company will not raise your rates if they see that you are responsible about your bill and they do not view a parking summons as a concern in regard to your likelihood of being involved in a car crash.

The line of thought goes far beyond a car. Whether you drive a truck, van, motorcycle or other type of vehicle, your rates can go up if you have been convicted of a moving or speeding violation.

For more on the topic, speak to an experienced independent insurance agent.

Essential Car Insurance Facts for Calgary

In Calgary, driving isn’t always easy. Drivers must brave weather that can change quickly, and heavy rush hour traffic. Regardless, you’ll always need car insurance, whether you are daily commuter, weekend adventurer, or an occasional driver.

Average Car Insurance Costs in Calgary and Alberta

Although Alberta has a private insurance market, the insurance rates themselves are still regulated by the provincial government. There are two agencies in Alberta that oversee car insurance rates: The Automobile Insurance Rate Board and the Office of the Superintendent of Insurance.

In 2004, Alberta implemented a premium grid on auto insurers, settings maximum premium levels for basic coverage. The grid takes into account where you live, the number of years you’ve been licensed, the number of claims you’ve had in the last six years, and how many driving convictions you have on your record. But it is still important to shop around because even with the premium grid, auto insurance rates vary wildly within Alberta.

If you are aged 25 or under in Alberta, you are considered young and will pay around $187/month for Alberta car insurance. However, as you get older your premiums will go down. For example, you’ll pay around $152/month at ages 31-35, about $122/month at ages 46-50, and around $100/month at ages 56-60.

Auto insurance rates in Alberta are determined by a variety of factors:

  • Your gender and age
  • Your driving experience
  • Type of vehicle you drive
  • Location and use of your vehicle
  • Your driving record
  • The amount of coverage you’ve selected

How to get the Cheapest Auto Insurance in Alberta

  1. Compare rates among various companies and don’t feel like you must stick with the insurers your parents used. There are many insurance providers available, and often they use competitive pricing, meaning different providers may offer the same policies at greatly different prices. Talk to a broker (who compares auto insurance rates in Calgary for you) or use online tools to see where you can get the best rate for the coverage that is right for you. As well, reading auto insurance reviews will help you avoid unexpected issues. Search online for opinions using blogs and forums.
  2. Sometimes you can get better rates if you bypass the broker or agent and deal with a direct insurer, like Belairdirect or TD Insurance.
  3. Use rate tools and calculators. For instance, if your credit card includes rental car protection, you can save 20 per cent by paying with it. You can use a credit card navigator tool to assist you in finding insurance for a rental car compatible with the value add-ons on your credit card. You can also use an insurance price comparison tool to compare insurance premiums.
  4. Bundle your car insurance in Calgary with other policies. For example, if you have multiple vehicles and a home to insure, you can bundle them with one insurance company to get a bundle discount. Insurance companies reward their customers for giving them more business.
  5. If you got your policy you were a smoker and can prove you have quit smoking since then and have not returned to it for at least one year, they will reduce your insurance premiums. Smokers typically pay double the amount for premiums!
  6. Invest in driving a hybrid vehicle. By purchasing a hybrid, you may save on more than just gas! Inquire with your insurance company to see if they offer discounts for hybrid vehicles.

As You Are Probably Already Aware, Auto Insurance Is Mandatory

Let's go over the most important factors that will bring your rates down the most.

* Drive a Vehicle that's Cheap to Insure

While this might seem like common sense to you, surprisingly many people spend days and weeks shopping for the right car, without ever considering the cost of coverage. Stay away from vehicles that are sporty with powerful V8 engines. This means Corvette's, Porsches and other high-performance cars. Also, take a couple of minutes and review the most stolen car list. You might be shocked that boring cars like Honda Accord's make this list every year. You will pay about 20% more for insuring one of these cars thieves target the most. Stick to a slightly used car like a Subaru Forester, and you will have a super safe ride that's also cheap to insure.

* Maintain a Good Credit Score

Carriers are putting a greater emphasis lately on a person credit score. The better your credit rating is, the less you will pay for coverage. The reasoning behind this is of course risk. People that are less risky financially are more likely to be more responsible drivers and not make reckless driving decisions. If you have a low score, take moves now to get it higher and also make sure there are not false items on your report that are dragging it down. Shoot for a credit score of 700 or more and insurers will offer you some sweet deals.

* Live in a Rural Area

If you are thinking of moving out of the city, then you might be pleasantly surprised that you can save more on auto insurance. Big cities that are congested naturally have higher rates because there are simply more cars on the road, which increases your chance of getting into an accident. Do a bit of research online, and you can save hundreds.

* Increase Your Deductible

This is a very easy tip that you should strongly consider and is something you can control 100%. Setting your deductible to a higher level, $ 1,000 or more, will save you on average about 10%. The catch is you will need to save all of this amount in case you do get into a crash and file a claim. If you have a really old car, older than 10 years, it's not worth getting a high deductible because the value of your car might only be $ 2,000 or $ 3,000. On the other hand, if you have a new vehicle, you will be paying more for coverage, so this is a great way to get a price break.

* Drop Useless Coverage

If you are in the market for automobile insurance, then take a look at your old policy. Read it carefully and go over each item. Do you see any coverage that was not needed? If so, when you apply for future quotes, get rid of unneeded add-on items. For example, if your credit card company already has you covered for rentals, you do not need additional coverage from your carrier. The same goes for towing and roadside assistance if you have a plan with an A³ plan. Get the coverage you need and nothing more and save your hard earned money.

* Get as many Discounts as you can

Insurers want your business, and a common incentive most use to lure you in, are discounts. Most providers have multiple discounts available. Your job is to take advantage of each one you qualify for. Some of the offers vary but can be anywhere from 5% to more than 10%. Here a few of the most common.

1. Safe Driver

This means no or very few tickets and no accidents on record.

2. Low Mileage

If you drive fewer than 1,000 miles monthly, you can qualify.

3. Military

If you are currently an active military member of vet, you can save about 5%.

4. Good Student

Students who have and maintain a B or higher GPA can get discounts up to 10%.

5. Multi-Car and Home Bundling

Insurers want your business, and you can save some serious dough by bundling all your vehicles and home together with one company.

6. Enhanced Safety Features

If you have special safety enhancements on your vehicle like dual airbags, anti-lock brakes and a GPS-based security alarm, you can qualify for a big discount.